Republic of the Philippines

Department of Education

Region V (Bicol)

DIVISION OF LIGAO CITY

Ligao City

 

DIVISION ANNUAL ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT CY 2006

 

ALICE I. TERRELL, Ed. D.

                                                                     Schools Division Superintendent

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

 

            As the 13th Division of DepEd Region V, Ligao City division envisioned the schools as a seat of culture and excellence made possible by school heads, teachers and other stakeholders with creative insights, sensitivity, vision, focus and patience who are empowered to produce God-loving, productive, innovative, responsible and globally competitive Ligaoeñoes.

           

            In our desire to address the needs of all the clienteles, serve and provide basic services of education, Ligao City Division has done its best “ To provide quality basic education for Filipino learners to acquire knowledge and skills necessary for the development of God-given talents, desired values, concepts and motivations through effective and efficient teaching methodologies for the total development of its clientele.”  By following this mission, our division tried its best to be part and parcel in the realization of national goals in line with the effective and efficient delivery of quality basic education.

 

            In line with its vision and mission, several measures have been implemented to give due considerations and address the urgent needs of the division.  These were composed of implementation of school projects based on the priority needs of each school through the assistance of the school governing council and other private sectors; strategic analysis; ocular inspection; contingency plans; and capacity building for teachers, school heads and non-teaching personnel.  Likewise, it includes preparation of school improvement plan, annual implementation plan, school report card and school operating budget by the school heads.

  

            Different committees composed of potential and capable.  DepEd human resources were created, and assistance of local government and other stakeholders were tapped despite of its existence as a newly created division for a period of one year and four months upon its approval on September 27, 2005.  These people were responsible for the successful delivery of educational services and the implementation of diverse programs and projects created in an effort to achieve the standards and targets set by the division in line with the students/pupils, staff, curriculum and physical development, as well as management and supervision of schools.  The application of participatory and consultative decision making process, and the employment of data-based, research and evaluation as bases in creating initiatives and making decisions ensure the successful implementation of the monitoring and evaluation scheme set by Ligao City Division.  Thus, its vision, mission and objectives were achieved by Ligao City Division.

 

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 DIVISION ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFF

 

 

 

 

NAME

POSITION / DESIGNATION

 

 

 

 

Alice I. Terrell, Ed. D.

Schools Division Superintendent                          

 

 

 

 

Rolando E. Gonzales

PSDS / AO3  Designate

 

 

 

 

Adelfa M. Dayandante, Ph.D.

PSDS / ES1, NFE-Designate

 

 

 

 

Carmelita A. Sinson

SSP3, Secondary Coordinator

 

 

 

 

Nelson S. Morales, Jr.

ES1, Private School & Pre-School Education;

HRMO – Designate

 

 

 

 

Alicia O. Retona

ES1, English (Secondary)

 

 

 

 

Carlito R. Boni

ESP-II, ES-I, English (Elementary), Designate

 

 

 

 

Ernie M. Baranquel

ES1, Science (Secondary)

 

 

 

 

Tita V. Agir

ESP1, ES1, Science (Elementary), Designate

 

 

 

 

Edna G. Gregorio

ES1, Mathematics (Elementary & Secondary)

 

 

 

 

Corazon B. Ocfemia

ES1, Filipino

 

 

 

 

Delia V. Mendoza

ES1, Social Studies

 

 

 

 

Erlindo P. Llanera

ES1, HEKASI

 

 

 

 

Naciancino O. Obsequio

ES1, TLE / EPP

 

 

 

 

Romeo S. Lindio, Sr.

ES­­­­­­1, MSEP, Designate

 

 

 

 

Marivic P. Diaz

ES1, Guidance, Research & Evaluation;

Planning Officer, Designate­

 

 

 

 

Jeana R. Revilla

MT1, Disbursing Officer, Designate

 

 

 

 

Alma P. Fajardo

T2, Bookkeeper, Designate

 

 

 

 

Vicente Sanchez

T3, Supply Officer, Designate

 

 

 

 

Mary Ann Registrado

T1, Mobile Teacher

 

 

 

 

Jodelle Ebriega

Clerk II

 

 

 

 

Ligaya Ante

Clerk II

 

 

 

 

Nelson dela Fuente

T2, Assistant Division Physical Facilities Coordinator

 

 

 

 

Amy Pernia

T2, Records Officer (Designate)

 

 

 

 

Benjamin C. Imperial

UTW1, Personnel Clerk

 

 

 

 

Ariel Flores

UTW1, General Services

 

 

 

 

Panchito S. Paragas

UTW

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nelson Lumawon

Job Order

 

 

 

 

Alfredo Belista

Job Order, Driver

 

 

 

 

Shiela Malabanan

Job Order

 

 

 

 

Evangeline Bobis

Job Order

 

 

 

 

Sherly L. Majadillas

Job Order

 

 

 

 

Sharon Borja

Job Order

 

 

 

 

Joan Borromeo

Job Order

 

 

 

 

 

Ma. Carla Co

Job Order

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A.   STATUS OF BASIC EDUCATION RESOURCES

 

 

1.   Number of Teacher, School Heads and Non-Teaching Personnel

 

            A.    ELEMENTARY

 

Table 1.1

 

Total Number of Nationally Funded Elementary Teachers

 

 

 

 

Plantilla Position

CY 2005

CY 2006

 

 

 

 

Teacher I

160

218

 

Teacher II

205

193

 

Teacher III

69

60

 

Master Teacher I

23

25

 

Master Teacher II

12

11

 

TOTAL

469

507

 

 

Table 1.2

 

Total Number of Elementary School Heads / Non-Teaching Personnel

 

Plantilla Position

CY 2005

CY 2006

 

 

 

 

Head Teacher I

1

1

 

Head Teacher II

2

2

 

Head Teacher III

11

7

 

Elementary School Principal I

16

20

 

Elementary School Principal II

1

1

 

Elementary School Principal III

1

1

 

Public Schools District Supervisor

2

2

 

Utility Worker

9

8

 

Clerk

1

2

 

TOTAL

44

44

 

 

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B.    SECONDARY

 

Table 1.3

 

Total Number of Nationally Funded Secondary Teachers

 

Plantilla Position

CY 2005

CY 2006

 

 

 

 

Teacher I

154

168

 

Teacher II

14

15

 

Teacher III

18

20

 

Master Teacher I

9

11

 

Master Teacher II

0

0

 

TOTAL

195

214

 

 

Table 1.4

 

Total Number of Secondary School Heads / Non-Teaching Personnel

 

Plantilla Position

CY 2005

CY 2006

 

 

 

 

Head Teacher I

1

1

 

Head Teacher II

0

0

 

Head Teacher III

5

6

 

Secondary School Principal I

3

5

 

Secondary School Principal II

1

1

 

Secondary School Principal III

1

1

 

Utility Worker

2

2

 

Disbursing Officer

2

3

 

Security Guard

2

2

 

Bookkeeper

2

2

 

Librarian

1

1

 

Guidance Counselor

1

1

 

Clerk

1

1

 

Storekeeper

0

0

 

TOTAL

23

26

 

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Table 1.5

 

Total Number of Teaching and Non-Teaching Personnel

Elementary and Secondary Level

 

 

LEVEL

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

TOTAL

2005

2006

2005

2006

2005

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elementary Teachers

469

507

38

40

507

547

Elementary School Heads and Non-Teaching Personnel

44

44

23

23

67

67

Secondary Teachers

195

214

22

22

217

236

Secondary School Heads and Non-Teaching Personnel

23

26

13

13

36

39

Grand TOTAL

731

791

96

98

827

889

 

2.     Number of Classrooms, Desks, Armchairs, Chairs and Tables

 

Table 2.1

 

Total Number of Instructional Rooms, Desks, Armchairs,

and Set of Tables and Chairs

 

Elementary Level

CY 2005

CY 2006

 

 

 

 

Total No. of Instructional Rooms

483

497

 

No. of Desks (2-seater)

2,343

2,391

 

Sets of Chairs and Tables

421

774

 

Armchairs (1 seater)

1,960

2,247

 

Table 2.2

 

Total Number of Instructional Rooms, Desks, Armchairs,

and Set of Tables and Chairs

 

Secondary Level

CY 2005

CY 2006

 

 

 

 

Total No. of Instructional Rooms

149

150

 

No. of Desks (2-seater)

0

0

 

Sets of Chairs and Tables

0

20

 

Armchairs (1 seater)

5,640

5,586

Table 2.3

 

Total Number of Desks, Armchairs, Sets of Tables and Chairs

 

LEVEL

DESKS

ARMCHAIRS

SETS OF TABLES AND CHAIRS

2005

2006

2005

2006

2005

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elementary Level

2,343

2,391

1,960

2,247

421

774

Secondary Level

0

0

5,640

5,586

0

20

TOTAL

2,343

2,391

7,600

7,833

421

794

                                                                                             

3.   Number of Textbooks by Learning Area and Grade / Year Level

 

Table 3.1

 

Number of Textbooks by Learning Area in the Elementary Level

 

Grade Level

Enrolment

Books

No. of Existing Textbooks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade I

3,821

Ø      Filipino

 

 

 

 

Wika

 

 

 

 

Pagbasa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      English

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading

 

 

 

 

Language

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Mathematics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade II

3,100

Ø      Filipino

 

 

 

 

Wika

 

 

 

 

Pagbasa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      English

 

 

 

 

Reading

 

 

 

 

Language

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Mathematics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade III

2,768

Ø      Science & Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Mathematics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      English

 

 

 

 

Reading

 

 

 

 

Language

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Filipino

 

 

 

 

Wika

 

 

 

 

Pagbasa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade Level

Enrolment

Books

No. of Existing Textbooks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade IV

2,655

Ø      Science

 

 

 

 

 

Text Box:  
 
There is no existing textbook at present due to destruction brought by Typhoon Reming

 

 

Ø      Mathematics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      HEKASI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      EKAWP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      English

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading        

 

 

 

 

Language

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Filipino

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wika

 

 

 

 

Pagbasa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Edukasyong Pampalakas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Sining

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Musika

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade V

2,643

Ø      Science

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Mathematics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      English

 

 

 

 

Reading

 

 

 

 

Language

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Edukasyong Pampalakas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Sining

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Musika

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      HEKASI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Filipino

 

 

 

 

Wika

 

 

 

 

Pagbasa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      EKAWP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grade VI

2,537

Ø      Science

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Mathematics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      English

 

 

 

 

Reading

 

 

 

 

Language

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Edukasyong Pampalakas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Sining

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Musika

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      HEKASI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      Filipino

 

 

 

 

Wika

 

 

 

 

Pagbasa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      EKAWP

 

 

 

 

 


 

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B.     SECTOR PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES

 

1.    Priority Sector Activity No. 1: Expanding Access to Basic Education

 

            1.1.   Strategies, thrusts, programs and projects to improve quality and relevance of basic education.

 

            In line with the continuing effort of the Department of Education to uplift the quality of education, Ligao City Division used several strategies relevant to national goals, DepEd thrusts, and programs based on the Education Development Plan of Central Office.  Likewise, instructional interventions and strategies have been considered by the division to ensure quality performance of school heads, teachers, pupils and stakeholders of education.   These programs, projects and interventions are discussed in the succeeding paragraphs.

 

            Result-Based Intervention for School Efficacy (RISE) started its implementation in the middle of 2005 and continued its implementation in the SY 2006 as a response to the low performance of the schools in Ligao City Division.  RISE adopts a crisis-response team approach to facilitate the implementation of a corrective action plan that benchmarks progress through a Key Results Recovery Matrix.  It advocates a comprehensive division intervention structure for best practices in schools on crisis.  The RISE team provides a technical support mechanism which serve as local governing boards for any individual school districts experiencing any sort of academic or management crisis.  The goal of this division initiative is “To institute and document successful reforms that will address and help all students achieve high level of performance in reading, writing, science and mathematics in a safe, clean and secured environment.”   Its components are as follows:  (1) improving student achievement in the core subjects;  (2) aligning teaching and learning process with the student’s performance;  (3) linking professional development for all staff to the goals of student’s development;  (4) providing safe, clean and secure school facilities;  (5) increasing management effectiveness, efficiency and accountability; and (6) creating stronger linkages with parents, families and the community.

 

            In terms of implementation, assessment of low-performing schools are conducted in five areas composed of pupil achievement, facility management, fiscal and budget management, community relations, and personnel management.  This implementation recovery plan is multifaceted and focuses on a school and division recovery, enhanced student achievement and clear expected outcomes.

 

            Project RISE has the following conditions: (1) all students must reach benchmarked standards of achievement on the implementation of “No Exception!        No Excuse” policy;  (2) the standards must be the same for all students / pupils;           (3) contribution to student performance is the only criteria for judging the merit of any activity that takes place at any level of the educational system;  (4) assessment systems, the curriculum, the entire instructional program, the professional development program, and the accountability system must be linked at every level to the standards  of student achievement;  (5) the entire community must be involved and organized       to support the students; (6) schools and division support staff must provide high performance  and  customer  friendly  workplaces;  (7)  good instruction is important, but each student needs to know that school and division staff care about him/her and that his/her success is achievable and important; and (8) school’s staff must provide staff with the freedom, training and motivation to make informed decisions as capable employees who are held accountable for the results of their work.

 

 

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            1.2.  Strategies, Thrusts, Programs and Projects to Expand Access

 

 

STRATEGIES AND PROGRAMS

 

 

A.        Nurturing High Performing Schools and Students

 

            This is based on the concept that:  (a) Everybody Counts Everyday; and            (b) T.E.A.M – Together, Everybody Achieves More, wherein school staff development and division-wide staff development focuses on achievement.  As a strategy, school board and school policy initiatives and teacher accountability should be paramount with the attainment of the goals towards high level of performance.

 

            In line with this strategy performing schools were awarded certificate of appreciation and token, while the top ten (10) pupils/students with high scores in the National Achievement Test, SY 2005-2006 were given tokens.  Such move was done to encourage and motivate other schools to improve their performance.  Likewise, schools are ranked according to its performance both in the academic and non-academic activities.

 

 

B.        Development of a Proactive Relations Programs

 

            It is a strategy defined by action that supports achievement and requires on-going two-way communication within the school and the community.  It utilizes community partners in their school reform efforts for overall problem solving, resource development, school-based and classroom monitoring of reform initiatives and creating a seamless delivery of educational support services:

 

            School Governing Council was created in each school to strengthen the partnership between the school and the community in managing the quality of instruction, and in the implementation of school projects and programs.

 

 

C.        Gate Keeping by the Division Office

 

            Educational programs can be developed and promoted by key stakeholders to support the on-going growth and internal relationship between division office administrators and principals.  These internal partnerships must focus on the following:  (1) Improving student achievement in the core subjects;  (2) Aligning teaching and learning with student performance;  (3) Linking professional development for all staff to the goals for the development of the students;  (4) Providing safe, clean and secure  school facilities; (5) Increasing management effectiveness, efficiency and accountability; and (6) Forging stronger linkages with parents, families and community.

 

            In line with the gate keeping strategy implemented by the division office, performance assessment review was conducted last October 2-3, 2006 at LWCES (B) Gymnasium.   School heads were grouped according to cluster and they were made to report their accomplishments – the activities conducted in their schools based on the six (6) areas enumerated above.

 

 

D.        Establishing Benchmarked Learning Expectations with Accountability Using System Wide and Standard Mandating Assessments In Reading,  Writing and Math.   Science and Core Subject Areas.

 

            Pupils / Students are assessed in phonics, assessment templates and spreadsheets are constructed to track student / pupil’s growth on a quality bases with individual teacher reflections and analysis.

 

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E.        Strategies That Enhance Student Performance

 

            These involves: (1) Assigning a set amount of homework per night, commensurate with age and accompanied by a program of parent coaching to enforce homework completion; (2) Making regular achievement recognition activities through written / unwritten form;  (3) Enforcing strict attendance standards with written letters, and home visitation to the parents of all absentees;  (4) Having mandatory school uniform;  (5) Using student port folios that would assist teacher’s evaluation of pupils / students; (6) Conferring with parents and students while teaching students how to monitor their own learning;  (7) Offering differential instruction and a variety of accelerated learning opportunities for low-performing students; and (9) Facilitating student participation in career development, fieldtrip, tours.

 

 

F.         Teacher Accountability Strategies

 

            It includes the following:  (1) Posting individual classroom and school improvement plans in offices and classroom;  (2) Using of all support staff for daily classroom visitation; (3) Requiring learning objectives to be posted in the classroom;  (4) Requiring teachers to develop weekly curriculum objectives that are matched to students’ need;  (5) Requiring monthly classroom assessment of curriculum objectives evaluated by teachers and school principals to determine the next step for teaching effectiveness; (6) Requiring quarterly spreadsheets of school wide assessments with teacher analysis of reflections; (7) Requiring analysis of student work samples during grade-level collaboration meetings; (8) Establishing monthly weekly grade-level meetings in which teachers debrief on in-class visitation and new teacher support; and (9) Establishing weekly teacher intervention meetings in which teachers debrief on at risk student and determine appropriate interventions.

 

 

G.        School Principals’ Assessment Process

 

            It includes an analysis of the school improvement plan, an examination of student achievement data, a comparison of student work related to the national standard in reading, science and math.  The promising instructional practices, including effective lesson delivery, writing assessments, student / pupil-centered environment, quality lesson plans, available instructional materials, test preparation, safety nets, protection of instruction and attendance.

 

 

H.        Leadership Coaching Program

 

            This is program which is result-based classroom visitations and action – oriented monitoring.  It covers the following:  (1) alignment of curriculum and instructional materials;  (2) school finance, facility  and personnel management;  (3) core academic standards; (4) alignment of student learning expectations to national academic standards;  (5) training and program development to help parents and the school community act as partners; (6) creation of assessment instruments, data and school management technologies to improve pupils performance.

 

 

I.          Special Education (SPED) Program

 

            Hand in hand with the efforts towards the attainment of academic excellence is the implementation of the Special Education (SPED) Program for bright pupils/ students and slow learners.

 

            Each school has a remedial reading program to cater the needs of slow readers and / or slow learners.  They were handled by trained master teachers so that they could be provided with the same opportunities offered to the bright ones.  However, Herrera Elementary School, Ligao East District provides special education to elementary pupils with physical deficiencies like mute, deaf and the like.  But they are mixed with the normal pupils who are handled by a trained SPED teacher.

 

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J.         Interdisciplinary Learning Approach

 

            In the secondary schools, the interdisciplinary approach was implemented in order for the students to develop according to their potentials and talents in line with the Theory of Multiple Intelligence.  The approach was spearheaded by Ligao National High School and eventually adopted by other high schools in the division and has been adopted by some elementary schools.  To further extend the implementation of Interdisciplinary Learning Approach, Project Share was launched by the division.

 

  

 

            Project Share captures the caring attitude of teachers to their peers in response to the direction of the President to improve the English language proficiency of teachers in English, Science and Mathematics as stipulated in Executive Order No. 210.  It responds to the need of Teachers teaching English, Science and Mathematics to raise the level of English language competency for the benefit of the learners.  It was conceptualized to seek the importance of sharing knowledge and resources with others and among peers to answer the growing concerns over the decline of English language proficiency of teachers as well as the level of the learners.

 

            Share as a project offers the value of sharing among teachers their teaching skills and strategies using the English language correctly.  It leads the way to a sharing of responsibility among teachers making their burdens lighten and making them feel nobody is left behind.

 

 

K.        Student Aide Program

 

            This is another program implemented by Ligao National High School.  It involves selected students to work in some projects and tasks instead of hiring outsiders to do the work.  These students are compensated a little lower than the amount paid to the skilled workers.  In this manner, the students who are poor but deserving, industrious and skilled are given financial assistance.

 

 

L.         Model of Excellence (MOE) Program

 

             The Model of Excellence Schools Program of the Books for the Barrios Foundation, Inc. based in California, USA is an innovative project of the heart that gives private institutions and individuals the opportunity to become partners of education in providing assistance in upgrading and modernization of public elementary schools.  It has transformed the first 3 elementary schools:  Ligao East Central School as the pioneer, Ligao West Central School (B), and Pandan Elementary School into a world-class learning institutions that set national standard and serve as models for all schools in the division.

 

Now, implementation of MOE Program has been extended to elementary schools in the division although some of its activities are not yet fully-implemented.

 

By virtue of Memorandum of Agreement made and entered into by the Local Government of Ligao, through the former City Mayor Fernando V. Gonzalez, the Department of Education represented by the Schools Division Superintendent of Albay (Ligao City then was still a part of Albay Division) and the Books for the Barrios Foundation Inc, represented by the President and Executive Director, Mrs. Nancy Stowe Harrington, MOE, school were established in Ligao City.  The City Government provided the physical infrastructure by constructing libraries and pre-school buildings, renovating and rehabilitating dilapidated classrooms and buildings, providing newly-painted bookshelves, tables and chairs, lighting, etc., putting up a Computer Learning Center as well as providing a tiled, well-secured, and painted classroom for the pre-school classes furnished with tables, chairs, bookshelves painted in primary colors and a tiled comfort room.

 

            The DepEd for its part provided the MOE school with a full-time computer teacher and a full-time pre-school teacher.

 

 

            The Books for the Barrios provided the school staff with the state-of-the-art teaching strategies and techniques through e-mail/ed instructions, trainings and visits to other progressive MOE schools in Manila, Cebu and other parts of the country.          

 

            Model of Excellence Program implementation was a great help in providing opportunities to elementary school children equal access to quality education.

 

 

M.        Supplementary Feeding Program

 

            Realizing that there is a direct relationship between the physical and mental well-being of the child and his nutritional and health condition, the division implements a program that takes care of the nutritional status and health of the school children.  The establishment of school canteens was encouraged and a certain percent of the canteen proceeds was utilized for the feeding of severely and moderately undernourished pupils.  This resulted in a reduction in the incidence of absenteeism and drop-outs in schools.  This program was able to attract more enrollees especially in the more depressed barangays of the city.

 

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KEY INDICATORS

 

A.        ENROLMENT

 

Table 4.1

 

Public and Private School Enrolment for Two Consecutive Years

(SY 2005-2006 to SY 2006-2007)

Elementary Level

 

Grade Level

Public Elementary School

Private Elementary School

SY 2005-2006

SY 2006-2007

Increase / Decrease

SY 2005-2006

SY 2006-2007

Increase / Decrease

1

3,850

3,821

-24

95

122

27

2

2,918

3,111

193

56

99

43

3

2,678

2,778

100

65

83

18

4

2,692

2,656

-36

50

74

24

5

2,648

2,645

-3

43

63

20

6

2,519

2,537

18

48

61

13

Total

17,305

17,548

243

357

502

145

 

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Table 4.2

 

Public and Private School Enrolment for Two Consecutive Years

(SY 2005-2006 to SY 2006-2007)

Secondary Level

 

Year Level

Public Secondary School

Private Secondary School

SY 2005-2006

SY 2006-2007

Increase / Decrease

SY 2005-2006

SY 2006-2007

Increase / Decrease

I

2,405

2,215

-190

237

190

-47

II

1,414

2,073

659

249

224

-25

III

1,658

1,312

-346

194

225

31

IV

1,504

1,529

25

177

188

11

Total

6,981

7,129

148

857

827

-30

 

Back to top^

 

 

Back........

 

B.        PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

 

Table 5

 

Report on Strategic Planning

SY 2005-2006

 

Indicators

Percentage

 

 

Elementary

 

Secondary

 

Participation Rate

93.19

76.14

 

Transition Rate

99.29

108.65

 

Retention Rate

92.34

87.82

 

Survival Rate

64.27

60.78

 

Graduation Rate

97.30

96.68

 

Completion Rate

63

59.14

 

Drop-out Rate

0.45

3.01

 

Repeater Rate

4.35

2.34

 

School Leaver Rate

9.08

14.95

 

 

Back to top^

 

 

Back........

 

C.        ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEMS

 

 

Table 6a

 

List of Alternative Learning System (ALS) Implementors

Ligao East District

 

 

Clustered Brgys./Schools

Cluster ALS Coordinators

Cluster Head

1.

Ligao East Central School (Tuburan)

Felicitas Peñafiel

Dr. Estrella O. Rapirap

2.

Layon Elementary School

3.

Paulog Elementary School

4.

Baligang Elementary School

Mariewin Bonao

Mabel Viscaya

5.

Amtic Elementary School

6.

Tambo Elementary School

7.

Basag Elementary School

8.

Herrera Elementary School

Arlene Abetria

Allan Alconera

9.

Don Teotimo Elementary School

10.

Nabonton Elementary School

11.

Binanowan Elementary School

Agnes Suarez

Casiano Perdigones

12.

Batang Elementary School

13.

Busay Elementary School

Salve Yanson

Diona S. Buni

14.

Barayong Elementary School

15.

Pinamaniquian Elementary School

Socorro Cyma Mijares

Alex Alano

16.

Bonga Elementary School

17.

Pandan Elementary School

18.

Tastas Elementary School

19.

Tinago Elementary School

Susan Matias

Josephine F. Iglesia

20.

Pinit Elementary School

21.

Busac Elementary School

Purisima B. Garcia

Jovito Oriola

22.

Oma-Oma Elementary School

23.

Tiongson Elementary School

24.

Malama Elementary School

Arnold Ferrer

Danilo P. Ballon

25.

Tupas Elementary School

26.

Paulba Elementary School

Salome Floriano

Wilfredo Calacday

27.

Tandarura Elementary School

 

Back to top^

 

 

Back........

Table 6b

 

List of Alternative Learning System (ALS) Implementors

Ligao West District

 

 

Clustered Brgys./Schools

Cluster ALS Coordinators

Cluster Head

1.

Ligao West Central School (B)

Paz Vista

Helen Abalos

2.

Ligao West Central School (P)

3.

Sta. Cruz Elementary School

4.

Allang Elementary School

Grace Vitero

Dexter Pielago  

5.

Francia Elementary School

6.

Palapas Elementary School

Melinda Reynancia

Leo Moral

7.

Balanac Elementary School

8.

Cavasi Elementary School

Bernardita Bañares

Lea Brutas

9.

Ranao-Ranao E/S

10.

Tinampo Elementary School

11.

Abella Elementary School

Salve Regilme

Rhodie Quirab

12.

Bacong Elementary School

13.

San Vicente Elementary School

14.

Mahaba Elementary School

Trinidad Brizo

Constantino Olivares

15.

Macalidong Elementary School

16.

Cabarian Elementary School

Adelina Perillo

Mercy Tejano

17.

Tambac Elementary School

18.

Catburawan Elementary School

19.

Maonon Elementary School

20.

Tula-Tula Elem. School (G)

Purisima Azores

Jesus Cha Jr.

21.

Tula-Tula Elem. School (P)

22.

Culliat Elementary School

ALS District Coordinator – EAST

Maribeth D. Villareal

 

ALS District Coordinator – WEST

Trinidad Brizo

 

ALS Mobile Teacher

Maryann B. Registrado

 

ALS PSDS/ES-I

Adelfa M. Dayandante, Ph. D.

 

 

 

Back to top^

 

 

Back........

 

 

Ø       

Barangay Without Elementary Schools

 

 

 

Barangay

 

Remarks

 

1.

Bobunsuran

-

Serviced by Cavasi Elementary School

 

2.

Tagpo

-

Serviced by Cavasi E/S & Sta. Cruz E/S

 

3.

Tomolin

-

Serviced by Sta. Cruz Elementary School

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.

Dunao

-

Serviced by Ligao West Central E/S (P)

 

5.

Bagumbayan

-

Serviced by Ligao West Central E/S (P) & (B)

 

6.

Guilid

-

Serviced by Ligao West Central E/S (B)

 

7.

Calsada

-

Serviced by Ligao East Central School (Tuburan)

 

8.

Bay

-

Serviced by Ligao East Central School (Tuburan) & Layon Elementary School

 

 

 

 

 

Ø       

Incomplete Elementary Schools

 

 

Ligao West District

-

Macalidong Elementary School

 

 

 

 

Tambac Elementary School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to top^

 

 

Back........

 

 

 

Table 7

 

ALTERNATIVE LEARNING SYSTEM

2006 Accomplishment Report

 

1.         Basic Literacy Program

 

                        a.  GAA Funded

 

Barangay/s

 

15 below

15-24

25-39

40-59

60 above

TOTAL

Buga, Nabonton 

e

5

2

7

11

0

1

0

0

0

0

14

12

26

c

5

2

7

11

0

1

0

0

0

0

14

12

26

Baligang

e

0

0

0

16

0

9

0

0

0

0

0

25

25

c

0

0

0

16

0

9

0

0

0

0

0

25

25

TOTAL

E

5

2

7

27

0

10

0

0

0

0

12

39

51

C

5

2

7

27

0

10

0

0

0

0

12

39

51

 

 

2.         Accreditation and Equivalency Program 

 

                        a.  LSDS GAA Funded

 

Barangay/s

 

15 below

15-24

25-39

40-59

60 above

TOTAL

ALS Learning Center Tuburan

e

0

0

12

10

3

0

0

0

0

0

15

10

*25

c

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Binatagan

e

0

0

15

1

3

0

0

0

0

0

18

1

19

c

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

E

0

0

27

11

6

0

0

0

0

0

23

11

44

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            *Enrolment increased from 25 to 33 effective July 2006

 

 

 

Back to top^

 

 

Back........

 

                        b.  LGU Funded

 

Barangay/s

 

15 below

15-24

25-39

40-59

60 above

TOTAL

Tula-Tula Grande

e

0

0

14

1

3

1

1

1

0

0

18

3

21

c

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mahaba

e

2

0

16

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

4

22

c

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nasisi (DSWD)

e

3

4

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

3

7

10

c

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

E

5

4

30

7

3

2

1

1

0

0

39

14

53

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.         Mobile Program 

 

 

Barangay/s

 

15 below

15-24

25-39

40-59

60 above

TOTAL

Binanowan

(A&E/ BLP)

e

2

1

12

8

0

4

0

1

0

0

14

14

28

c

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

E

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

4.         Literacy Cum Livelihood Project 

 

                        a.  GAA Funded

 

Barangay/s

Courses

 

15 below

15-24

25-39

40-59

60 above

TOTAL

Tuburan LGU & BCCD (NGO)

Consumer Electronics

e

0

0

20

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

20

3

23

c

0

0

20

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

20

3

23

Tambo

Automotive Mechanics

e

0

0

24

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

29

0

29

c

0

0

24

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

29

0

29

Nabonton

Driving Mechanics

e

0

0

15

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

20

0

20

c

0

0

15

0

5

0

0

0

0

0

20

0

20

Binanowan

Bamboo Craft

e

2

0

10

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

12

0

12

c

2

0

10

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

12

0

12

Pinit

Handicraft

e

0

0

7

6

0

1

0

1

0

0

7

8

15

c

0

0

7

6

0

1

0

1

0

0

7

8

15

Tuburan

Cosmetology

e

0

0

1

8

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

9

10

c

0

0

1

8

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

9

10

Bagumbayan

Dressmaking

e

0

0

0

4

0

8

0

3

0

0

0

15

15

c

0

0

0

4

0

8

0

3

0

0

0

15

15

Baking & Food Processing

e

0

0

0

2

0

9

0

4

0

0

0

15

15

c

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuburan

Driving (TESDA)

e

0

0

23

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

26

0

26

c

0

0

23

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

26

0

26

Tuburan

Basic Driving (Batch 2

e

0

0

17

1

11

0

0

0

0

0

28

1

29

c

0

0

7

1

11

0

0

0

0

0

18

1

19

Handicraft

e

0

0

0

0

0

7

0

8

0

0

0

15

15

c

0

0

0

0

0

7

0

8

0

0

0

15

15

Paulog – LGU&BCCD (NGO)

Cosmetology

e

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

c

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0